Germany rejects Trump's claim it owes NATO and U.S. 'vast sums' for defense

German Defense minister Ursula von der Leyen listens to media in Amari air base, Estonia, March 2, 2017. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
German Defense minister Ursula von der Leyen listens to media in Amari air base, Estonia, March 2, 2017.

REUTERS/Ints Kalnins

German Security Minister Ursula von der Leyen on Sunday rejected U.S. President Donald Trump’s declare that Germany owes NATO and the united states “vast sums” of cash for Protection.

“There Is No debt account at NATO,” von der Leyen mentioned in a observation, adding that it Was Once wrong to hyperlink the alliance’s target for individuals to spend 2 % of their economic output on Safety by means of 2024 solely to NATO.

“Safety spending also goes into UN peacekeeping missions, into our European missions and into our contribution to the fight in opposition to IS terrorism,” von der Leyen stated.

She stated everybody needed the burden to be shared reasonably and for that to occur it Was Once vital to have a “modern safety thought” that incorporated a modern NATO but in addition a european Safeguard union and funding in the United International Locations.

Trump stated on Twitter on Saturday – a day after meeting German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Washington – that Germany “owes vast sums of cash to NATO & the united states must be paid extra for the highly effective, and really dear, Protection it provides to Germany!”

Trump has entreated Germany and different NATO participants to speed up efforts to satisfy NATO’s Security spending goal.

German Safety spending is about to rise through 1.Four billion euros to 38.5 billion euros in 2018 – a determine that’s projected to characterize 1.26 % of economic output, Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble has mentioned.

In 2016, Germany’s Safety spending ratio stood at 1.18 p.c.

All Over her travel to Washington, Merkel reiterated Germany’s dedication to the 2 percent military spending purpose.

(Reporting by using Andreas Rinke; writing through Michelle Martin; modifying by Jason Neely)

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